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Latest Cathedral News

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Expressions of God’s Glory

Homily offered by The Rev'd Dr Ann Solari on The Feast of St John, 3rd May 2015.

Download here.

Executions in Indonesia

This morning I woke to the news that Andrew Chan, Myuran Sukumaran and six others had been executed in Indonesia.

I felt incredibly numb. And incredulous.

I could’t even begin to imagine the pain felt by their families.

I found myself wondering what must go through the minds of those involved and particularly those charged with pulling the trigger, flicking the switch, or injecting a lethal dose. Do they go numb themselves? Do they ever stop seeing the eyes of their victims in their dreams? Do they dehumanise the victim so that they can go through with the act of deliberated murder? Is their justification that they are ‘just following orders’? Does the justifying narrative they have woven for themselves hold up as the human being before them is blown apart? Do they end up suffering from PTSD?

The thing I find most disturbing about execution is the calculated nature of the exercise. Hundreds, possibly thousands, of Indonesian officials have spent years caught up in the relentless journey to this day. It has been done according to the Rule of Law. Done by the book. Due process has been followed. Appeals heard. Clemency sought and denied. Ten years of focussed activity. State-sanctioned murder is an inhumane activity hidden beneath layers of civil order and procedure.

I am mindful of the fact that the people responsible are ordinary people just like me.

At present we are in the Easter Season, the season that proclaims that all that is death-dealing will be transformed by God who is life and love. As people of the resurrection we are called to be agents of God on earth.

So as the day has progressed I have found myself climbing out of the numbness of the early day towards an increased determination to work for a world characterised by love and justice. I have reminded myself that when Amnesty International began campaigning against the death penalty thirty years ago less than twenty nations had abandoned the death penalty. Today over 100 nations have abolished it. So in response to the state-sanctioned murder of the eight people in Indonesia I rededicate myself to continuing this important work.

Peace,

Peter Catt+

Refugees, Fracking and Cyclones are Three Sides of the Same Coin

This Opinion Piece by The Dean was published in The Brsbane Times for Palm Sunday:

 

The lie that we are separate individuals is dying; dying I hope, faster than the planet which is being destroyed by the fruits of that lie.

The lead poem in Walt Whitman's great work, Leaves of Grass, is titled Song of Myself. It begins with the words "I celebrate myself". These words make for a first impression that the poem is a self-serving or even narcissistic exercise. However the reader soon comes to appreciate that Whitman is really exploring the idea that what affects you affects me - and vice versa. His third line is "For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you".

Whitman explores the territory surveyed by John Donne a few hundred years before him and by Mary Oliver in more recent times. John Donne stated that no one should view themselves as an island but as part of a continent,

 

 

Read the full piece here.

Lord Mayor's Prayer Breakfast - Tickets on Sale Now

Tickets are now available for the 2015 Lord Mayor's Prayer Breakfast to be held at City Hall on Thursday 7 May 2015, 6.45am for 7.30am commencement.

Keynote Speaker - Ms Anne Cross
This year's keynote speaker will be Ms Anne Cross, Chief Executive Officer of UnitingCare Queensland since November 2003.  She is also the Chair of Australian Regional and Remote Community Services (ARRCS Ltd), UnitingCare Queensland's aged and community services in the Northern Territory. Anne is the 2014 Australian Business Woman of the Year, and is also this year's winner for the government and community category in Australia.

Anne has recently been a member of the Queensland Government Domestic and Family Violence Taskforce led by Dame Quentin Bryce AD CVO.  Anne's keynote address will explore the issue of Domestic Violence.  She will also hold an interactive Q&A session following the breakfast (commencing 8.45am), where audience members will be invited to ask questions.

Donations made at this year's breakfast will assist the Hope Foundation, a national charity, based in Brisbane, supporting women wanting a life of change from addictions and/or the sex industry.
http://www.hopefoundation.org.au/

For more details and to book click here

Chocolate Easter Eggs Return to St John’s

 

‘If it weren’t for Aldi this wouldn’t be happening’, The Dean of St John’s Cathedral, Brisbane, Dr Peter Catt, said.

‘It was a close thing.’

Last year the only chocolate egg to be seen at St John’s was the one pictured on the Cathedral’s notice board.

‘Last year we made the decision to abandon chocolate eggs after a fruitless search for eggs certified to be ‘slavery-free’’’, Dr Catt said

Vanuatu Cyclone Pam Emergency Appeal

The Anglican Board of Mission has launched an Emergency Appeal following Cyclone Pam which hit Vanuatu on March 14, cutting communications and leaving communities across the islands with no infrastructure.

A State of Emergency has been being declared following the cyclone which left eight people confirmed dead when it hit the 65 islands with a total population of 267,000. The death toll is expected to rise significantly once communication is re-established with areas outside Port Villa, the capital city.

Just Chocolate for Easter: Social Justice Newsletter

In this issue:

Download the latest newsletter here.

Loaves and Fishes Lunch: Book Now

Helping Homeless Youth

Guest Speaker: The Hon. Dame Quentin Bryce AD CVO

Tuesday 5th May, 12.30pm

Download the brochure here

The funds raised this year at the luncheon will be directed to youth homelessness services provided by Anglicare Southern Queensland.

 

System To Detain Children Can’t Be Fixed: Church Taskforce Speaks out in Wake of Human Rights Commission Report on Children in Detention

At a time when the Australian Prime Minister has promised that “good government starts today”, the Australian Human Rights Commission releases a report calling for the Government to end placing children into immigration detention. But will the “new Tony” demonstrate his Christian values.

The Australian Churches Refugee Taskforce today welcomed the release of The Forgotten Children by the Australian Human Rights Commission (AHRC), following the 2014 National Inquiry into Children in Immigration Detention.

‘The findings of the Australian Human Rights Commission could not be clearer,’ said The Very Reverend Dr Peter Catt, Chair of the Taskforce. ‘We are failing child asylum seekers in the most morally reprehensible way under the current regime of arbitrary and indefinite detention. We cannot ignore our responsibilities, and so we call for the immediate release of children from detention – and for those children on Nauru to be brought to the Australian mainland’.

Sister Brigid Arthur, Vice Chair of the Taskforce, noted that successive governments have failed to take heed of the lessons from the last AHRC report in 2004. ‘For ten years we have known about the devastating impact of prolonged detention on children, from severe mental ill-health, to developmental delays and lasting emotional and psychological trauma,’ Sister Brigid said. ‘The Taskforce has long advocated for all children in detention, but especially those without parents. That children without parents have no functioning guardianship arrangements, or independent advocate – another key finding of the Report – is a horrific indictment on our Government. These children are being punished for seeking asylum, and being denied the right to have someone who has their best interests at heart.”

 

To read more click here

Remember The Dardanelles


The cathedral coin collection is situated in the ambulatory adjacent to the Holy Spirit Chapel.There are 110 permanent coins capturing the history of Christianity. Coin 111 changes from time-to-time to allow a focus on subjects of contemporary interest.
Currently in place of coin 111 we are displaying a medal issued by the Queensland Patriotic Fund in 1915 to raise money to help serving and former military personnel.
The Dardanelles was the strait between the peninsula of Gallipoli in Europe and the mainland of Asia Minor. In World War I it was the site of the Gallipoli Campaign, in which the British and allied forces attempted to capture the peninsula in order to allow their naval forces to push through the strait to Istanbul. The Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) landed on the peninsula on 25th April 1915 at a cove subsequently called Anzac Cove. The Turks were prepared for the landing and the Anzacs suffered heavy losses. The allied forces were completely withdrawn from the peninsula on 9th Jan. 1916.
Despite the failure of the campaign, the bravery of the Anzacs and the mateship that occurred amongst them made it a special occasion for the fledgling nations, and for Australians and New Zealanders the 25th April every year is Anzac Day, when they remember the Dardanelles and the soldiers who fought in all the wars.


crests
St John's Cathedral, 373 Ann Street, Brisbane, Qld, Australia. Open for visitors from 9.30am-4.30pm daily.