Make An Enquiry

St John's Cathedral

Anglican Diocese of Brisbane

St John's Cathedral

Anglican Diocese of Brisbane

St John's Cathedral

Anglican Diocese of Brisbane

St John's Cathedral

Anglican Diocese of Brisbane

St John's Cathedral

Anglican Diocese of Brisbane

Tuesday 25th January
6.30pm

Image - Coffee on Wednesdays (COWS)


OUTREACH THROUGH OFFERINGS
JANUARY: EMERGENCY RESPONSE to AFGHAN CRISIS
(For details scroll down this page)

ACT FOR PEACE also have an emergency appeal for Tonga
Click here for details

WELCOME TO ST JOHN’S ANGLICAN CATHEDRAL, BRISBANE
St John’s Cathedral is home to a community which seeks to bring the best of Anglican tradition into dialogue with the issues and needs of our day.

We strive for open-minded conversation, seek to practice inclusion, and reflect on how we might see our beliefs put into action. We want this to be a place where people are encouraged to seek God and progress their own spiritual journeys.

The Cathedral itself, a renowned Brisbane landmark, serves as a magnet, where diverse people gather to worship, celebrate, seek solace, converse and learn.

Peace,
Peter Catt +
Dean of Brisbane

 

Covid-19 Update:
The Cathedral is open for:

Saturday
Holy Eucharist,5pm

Sunday
Holy Eucharist, 7.30am
Holy Eucharist, 9.30am
Choral Evensong, 6pm

Monday to Friday
Morning Prayer, 8.30am
Private prayer, 11am to 2pm
Evening Prayer, 4pm

Eucharist, 7am
Tuesday and Friday

Eucharist, 12.30pm
Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday

Prayer During the Day, 12.30pm
Monday and Thursday.

Cathedral Shop Open
Sundays (following the 7.30am and 9.30am services), Monday to Friday 11am  to 2pm

 

Facebook Feeds

This message is only visible to admins.
Problem displaying Facebook posts.
Click to show error
Error: Server configuration issue

STREAMING OF SERVICES and SERVICE NOTES

SERVICE NOTES
Here you will find quick links to two weeks of Service Notes for each of our four Sunday services.

These will be updated each Thursday –
“THIS WEEK” covers the coming Sunday;
“LAST WEEK” the preceding Sunday.

Click the title bar or ‘+’ button to toggle open your chosen week and select the service time.

LAST WEEK'S SERVICE NOTES

Saturday 15th January

5pm Eucharist

 

Sunday 16th January

7.30am Eucharist

9.30am Sung Eucharist

6pm Choral Evensong

THIS WEEK'S SERVICE NOTES

Saturday 22nd January 

 

Sunday 23rd January 

7.30am Holy Eucharist – Sundays
Click here for Live Stream on The Cathedral YouTube Channel
The stream will appear on our channel at approximately 7.15am Sunday
Click here for Service Notes

9.30am Choral Eucharist – Sundays
Click here for Live Stream on The Cathedral YouTube Channel
The stream will appear on our channel at approximately 9.15am Sunday
Click here for Service Notes

Sung Evensongs
Resume on January 30

Live Stream Sundays at 6pm
The stream will appear on our channel at approximately 5.45pm Sunday

Click here to access Service Notes

Morning Prayer 
Monday to Friday
8.30am

Details on Services Page

To access an electronic copy of the Prayer Book, please email: cathedral@stjohnscathedral.com.au

GENERAL NEWS

Welcome to St John’s Cathedral. The news items below highlight topics of general interest.
For details of special events and concerts at the Cathedral please see the WHAT’S ON page.
You may find information about our regular worship times on the SERVICES page.

OUR PLACE IN HISTORY:
THE CATHEDRAL and DEANERY HERITAGE APPEALS
The National Trust of Australia (Queensland) has listed The Cathedral and The Deanery (Adelaide House) because of their significance to the heritage of Queensland and Australia more broadly. Adelaide House was the first Government House when Queensland was created on 10th December 1859. The balcony on which Sir George Bowen read the proclamation that day has been the subject of a great deal of work to restore it to a stable and safe condition. The cathedral is the only stone-vaulted church in the Southern hemisphere and is highly regarded as a sublime example of neo-gothic architecture. Donations to the Cathedral fund are used to enhance and presence the fabric of the magnificent building.

Donations to the National Trust of Australia (Queensland) for these appeals are allowable as deductions for tax purposes.

Find out more on our DEANERY APPEAL page.

Opening the Gift of Christmass:
Alexander John Shaia

Amidst decorations, carols and shopping, have we missed the deeper journey of Christmas in all its symbolic power? Can we reintegrate the Gospel stories of Jesus’ birth with the natural cycles and rhythms of creation and our own human experience? Alexander John Shaia joins Peter and Dom to talk about Christmas traditions from evergreen trees to Santa Claus and finds a richness that brings together the two great books of nature and scripture. In the narrative of new birth heard every Christmas, we bear witness to the radiance at the heart of all things and are reminded that new life always happens in the midst of the deepest darkness. 

Download the episode here

The Land is not Empty:
Sarah Augustine

Some may think that pronunciations about law made in the fifteenth century during an age of European expansion and exploration would have little impact on lives today. Yet the Doctrine of Discovery is doing just that. It is a body of law and policy, legitimated by the Church, that says land is considered “empty” and therefore free for the taking if inhabited by “heathens, pagans, and infidels”. This doctrine continues to define reality for indigenous peoples across the globe in those parts of the world colonised when Europeans sought new lands across the oceans. Sarah Augustine joins the podcast, bringing a depth of experience in addressing the current and shocking impact of colonising systems and laws that continue to justify exploitation of land and peoples. Sarah believes there is still hope for the righting of wrongs, but the work is urgent as “what was done in the name of Christ must be undone in the name of Christ.”

Sarah Augustine is founder and cochair of the Coalition to Dismantle the Doctrine of Discovery and is the author of The Land is Not Empty (2021)

 

CATHEDRAL OFFERINGS
NEW: ONLINE DONATIONS PAGE!

Our Cathedral has adopted the simple, convenient online payment channel of Tithe.ly — designed by and for churches — and currently used by more than 12,000 churches and ministries in over 50 countries.

Scan or click on the QR code above, to visit our GIVE page on this website: you may make an offering to our Cathedral and its work – either as a one-off or recurring gift –
using a credit card by clicking on the
green GIVE NOW button or the
GENERAL DONATIONS image block, which will open a simple, pop-up Tithe.ly form without you having to leave this site.

MORE INFO: please visit our GIVE page

OUTREACH – JNAUARY 2021


AFGHANISTAN:
EMERGENCY RESPONSE

Achieving safety, justice and dignity in communities impacted by conflict and natural disaster.

As each new year approaches, none can predict the challenges which will inevitably confront aid agencies. Beyond the ongoing challenge of the COVID-19 pandemic, there are many more, as climate change accelerates the effect of natural disasters which shape the lives of people in various places of the world: earthquakes, tsunamis, cyclones, typhoons, floods, fire and drought. 

Among the greatest of current disasters are those which are not ‘natural’, but man-made. Beyond man’s impact on climate change is conflict – war, internal unrest, and even genocide – which add to natural disasters displacing people from their homes…. 

Today, there are more refugees, asylum seekers and displaced people worldwide than at any time since World War II. That’s more than 80 million people forced to flee their homes to escape conflict and disaster. 

They are the world’s most vulnerable people; mothers and fathers struggling to feed their children; sons and daughters missing out on an education; people dying for want of basic medical care that we take for granted in Australia; and families who, after losing everything, are not getting the support they deserve to rebuild their lives.

It’s a terrible injustice. And one that we can, and must, overcome. 

Front and centre among the current refugees are those fleeing Afghanistan after the return of the Taliban in August 2020. Their urgent need has deflected attention from those refugees who have spent years in camps awaiting the chance for a new life: more than 660,000 Syrian refugees in Jordan, all of them suffering the lack of basic needs for survival – food, medical assistance and vital  support   to   rebuild   their   lives;

hundreds of thousands of Rohingya refugees camped in Bangladesh to escape persecution and violence in Myanmar; severely overstretched refugee camps in Ethiopia housing close to 792,000 refugees; and more than three million Iraqi people forced from their homes in Iraq, devastated by decades of violence and conflict. These people arrive at over-crowded refugee camps, terrified and exhausted, their children traumatised, having had no safe place to learn or play.

Then there are those nations which are constantly plagued by emergency needs. The Philippines is one of the most disaster-prone countries in the world, with typhoons regularly causing destruction through their agricultural areas, and displacing millions of people from villages which are not built to survive strong weather.  Further complicating these urgent needs, the Philippines is also deeply affected by ongoing conflict creating a climate of fear among many parts of the population. 

Act for Peace not only supports these emergency responses, but is also teaching vulnerable communities how to plan for and respond to disasters, and continues to promote a culture of justice and peace through human rights and advocacy work.

Emergencies will always be ahead. Thankfully, Act for Peace will always be there, working through their local partners and supporting people to reach safety, and achieve justice and dignity in their lives.

Click for more

Today, there are more refugees, asylum seekers and displaced people worldwide than at any time since World War II. That’s more than 80 million people forced to flee their homes to escape conflict and disaster. 

They are the world’s most vulnerable people; mothers and fathers struggling to feed their children; sons and daughters missing out on an education; people dying for want of basic medical care that we take for granted in Australia; and families who, after losing everything, are not getting the support they deserve to rebuild their lives.

It’s a terrible injustice. And one that we can, and must, overcome. 

Front and centre among the current refugees are those fleeing Afghanistan after the return of the Taliban in August 2020. Their urgent need has deflected attention from those refugees who have spent years in camps awaiting the chance for a new life: more than 660,000 Syrian refugees in Jordan, all of them suffering the lack of basic needs for survival – food, medical assistance and vital  support   to   rebuild   their   lives;

hundreds of thousands of Rohingya refugees camped in Bangladesh to escape persecution and violence in Myanmar; severely overstretched refugee camps in Ethiopia housing close to 792,000 refugees; and more than three million Iraqi people forced from their homes in Iraq, devastated by decades of violence and conflict. These people arrive at over-crowded refugee camps, terrified and exhausted, their children traumatised, having had no safe place to learn or play.

Then there are those nations which are constantly plagued by emergency needs. The Philippines is one of the most disaster-prone countries in the world, with typhoons regularly causing destruction through their agricultural areas, and displacing millions of people from villages which are not built to survive strong weather.  Further complicating these urgent needs, the Philippines is also deeply affected by ongoing conflict creating a climate of fear among many parts of the population. 

Act for Peace not only supports these emergency responses, but is also teaching vulnerable communities how to plan for and respond to disasters, and continues to promote a culture of justice and peace through human rights and advocacy work.

Emergencies will always be ahead. Thankfully, Act for Peace will always be there, working through their local partners and supporting people to reach safety, and achieve justice and dignity in their lives.

It only takes a little over $200 to provide temporary shelter to a family, and a little over $100 to provide water and hygiene kits to prevent the spread of disease. Can we give at least $1,000 to help the Act for Peace Emergency Response program bring the immediate needs of food, medical care and shelter to those devastated by natural disaster; to teach people how to prepare for such events, and to advocate for justice and dignity among the displaced and needy peoples of the world? 

Cathedral Outreach envelopes for January are available at the outreach poster in the Narthex. Please place your donation in a January outreach envelope and give it with your offering, place it in the Donations Box, give it to a cathedral warden, or to the Cathedral Office Monday-Friday. Donations of $2 or more to Act for Peace are tax-deductible. To obtain a receipt, please write your name and address on the back of your outreach envelope. Using electronic banking, make a bank transfer to BSB 034 003  Account No: 385378;  please narrate your deposit “Outreach Jan22” and also email outreach@stjohnscathedral.com.au to inform us of your deposit (include the amount), and to provide your postal details for the receipt. For other forms of payment, please phone the Cathedral Office [(07) 3835 2222] during normal business hours Monday-Friday. Cheques should be made payable to Act for Peace. ACT FOR PEACE  will provide receipts, probably during March or April. 

Thank you.

 

Make An Enquiry